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Why do flying saucers have to spin while flying?

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Set during the Cold War period, the then-president rented five (5) flying saucers from the extraterrestrial aliens and a few training exercises were conducted in the air space above Roswell. My father was a young US Air Force lieutenant and mentioned he had crashed landed one of the saucers during training, leading to his court martial.

Unfortunately, he never told me anything about the saucer except that the chassis rotates at high speed and is powered by an antimatter propulsion engine. I want to know why flying saucers have to spin during flight.

There aren't rotary blades to generate lift inside the atmosphere and it is a complete vacuum in space, kindly use magic sparingly and no FTL tech.

Why should this post be closed?

This post was sourced from https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/q/170684. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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3 answers

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Stabilization by gyroscopic effect, plain and simple.

A gyroscope (from Ancient Greek γῦρος gûros, "circle" and σκοπέω skopéō, "to look") is a device used for measuring or maintaining orientation and angular velocity.

Any space probe we have sent into space use rotation for the very same reason.

This post was sourced from https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/170685. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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What L.Dutch said, plus whatever process is making the hull rotate is making it act like a turbine from a wind or hydro power plant. From a certain point of view, the whole outside of the ship is an alternator. That supplies the ship with electricity. No spin = no power = no avionics (and possibly no juice for the thrusters too).

This post was sourced from https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/170784. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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To create Artificial Gravity.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_gravity

These ships do years-long missions in space, and months in microgravity is just unhealthy.

This post was sourced from https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/170782. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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